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Quiz - Discrimination definitions

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Discrimination definitions

Match the definitions of different types of discrimination on the left to the correct example of that type of discrimination on the right. Answers at the bottom of the page.

Definition

Example

1. Direct discrimination
Being treated worse than others because of who you are.

A. Ann has cerebral palsy and walks with sticks. Her local park has staggered metal bars at the entrance to keep cyclists out but they also stop Ann getting in.

2. Indirect discrimination
A rule or way of doing things that applies to everyone but puts you, and other people like you, at a
disadvantage.

B. Darren is a young black man. A particular store detective always follows him round the supermarket making comments about how he won’t get away with ‘nicking’ anything and how he should ‘go back to where he came from’.

3. Harassment
Someone saying or doing things because of who you are that you find offensive, humiliating, frightening, sexually innappropriate or distressing.

C. A local college turns Sara down for a counselling course, suggesting she reapplies when she’s a bit older.

4. Victimisation
Being punished for complaining about discrimination or helping someone else to complain about discrimination.

D. Tabitha has ME. Her employer sacked her because of all the time she had off because of it.

5. Failure to make reasonable adjustments
Steps to reduce disadvantage experienced by disabled people.

E. An employer changes the shift patterns for all full-time employees so they have to work at least one Saturday in the month. Reuben explains to his manager that he can’t work on a Saturday because he’s Jewish. His manager tells him he either does it, or they’ll let him go.

6. Being treated unfairly because of something to do with your disability
Need we say more?

F. When Jamie’s co-workers found out he’s gay, they started ignoring him, making snide comments and blaming him for their mistakes. He made a complaint about them. Shortly afterwards he was made redundant.

Answers: (1) C and B; (2) E; (3) B and F; (4) F; (5) A; (6) D.

September 2010

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About 'Is that discrimination?'

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'Is that discrimination?' is supported by the European Union Programme for Employment and Social Solidarity – PROGRESS 2007–2013. The information on these pages covers England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. For more information see About 'Is that discrimination?'.

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